[vc_column_text]
Change your cover photo
Change your cover photo
This user account status is Approved

This user has not added any information to their profile yet.

My Profile Image
My Photo Image
My Family Image
My History Image
MY PLACE OF REST
Brief History Photo

The body of Private Conrad Schmer, Co, B, 355th infantry, 89th division will arrive in Lincoln Friday afternoon. Schmer was killed in action November 4, 1918, in the Meuse-Argonfie drive. He was buried in the American cemetery at Commune et Failty Ardemines in France.

The body arrived in the United States October 4. It will be taken to Splain & Schnell undertaking parlors in Lincoln, upon its arrival here, and held pending funeral arrangements, which have not be announced.

Schmer was the son of Mr and Mrs. George Schmer of Weston, Neb. Henry P. Brown, undertaker - Adv.

MY PROFILE
Conrad Schmer|http://mylivinghistory.org/user/conradschmer/
MY FAVORITE THINGS
MY ORGANIZATIONS
MY EDUCATION
MY CAREER
MY MILITARY CAREER
MY FAMILY
MY SPOUSE AND/OR PARTNER
MY CHILDREN
MY PARENT(S)
MY BROTHER(S) AND SISTER(S)
MY GRAND PARENTS
MY PET
MY STORY

The road between Sections 21 and 3A is shaded by a lovely canopy of sycamore trees. A stroll into the gravestones of Section 3A brings a walker to the granite marker of Conrad Schmer, with another photographic portrait. Mr. Schmer was born in Russia in 1895 but as his name suggests and the German inscriptions on his monument confirm, his ethnic background was German.

Translated it reads, “Here rests in peace, Conrad Schmer, born in Russia, killed in France”.

Hundreds of thousands of Germans colonized Russia in the eighteenth century, attracted by offers of land, autonomy, and freedom to retain their language and religion.

A century later, in the last decades of the nineteenth century, the Russian government pushed to integrate the German settlers into Russian society and a massive emigration began.

Tens of thousands of Germans from Russia settled in the American Midwest, and the largest urban concentration was in Lincoln. Like many of Lincoln’s immigrants, Conrad Schmer lived in the South Bottoms neighborhood and worked for Burlington Railroad repairing train cars.

MY PHOTOS
[sf_insert_gallery]
MY VIDEOS
[sf_insert_video_gallery]

[/vc_column_text]
[vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text]